Best fantasy books chosen by experts

We list the best fantasy books recommended by critics from Washington Post, NPR, New York Times and many more. All critics' recommendations are referenced with customer reviews. The rating you see is an aggregate from several platforms and is always higher than 4 out of 5 stars.

4.6 Stone Sky

The Stone Sky (The Broken Earth) by N. K. Jemisin

NPR

“A transformative cap to a series that hasn’t so much raised the bar on epic fantasy as it has fundamentally changed the genre.”

Featured in NPR’s Book Concierge Great Reads of 2017.

$13
4.0 The Power Alderman

The Power: A Novel by Naomi Alderman

Washington Post

“Excitement about this dystopian novel has been arcing across the Atlantic since it won the Women’s Prize for Fiction earlier this year in England. Alderman’s premise is simple, her execution endlessly inventive.”

Featured in Washington Post’s Best 10 Books of 2017.

$19
4.2 The River Bank

The River Bank: A sequel to Kenneth Grahame’s The Wind in the Willows

NPR

“The River Bank is that species of fan fiction that unfolds new material from a beloved property with hardly a hint of a seam.”

Featured in NPR’s Book Concierge Great Reads of 2017.

$16
4.4 The Book of Dust

The Book of Dust: La Belle Sauvage (Volume 1)

Washington Post

“This enthralling prequel to the ‘His Dark Materials’ trilogy takes up the story of Malcolm Polstead, who must save baby Lyra.”

Featured in Washington Post’s 50 Notable Fiction Books of 2017.

$14
4.6 An Excess Male

An Excess Mall: A Novel by Maggie Shen King

Washington Post

“Through an almost satirical look into a near-future China, King’s debut makes a compelling argument that marriage is a method of societal control.”

Featured in Washington Post’s 5 Best Fantasy Books of 2017.

$10
4.0 The Epiphany Machine

The Epiphany Machine by David Burr Gerrard

Washington Post

“In this razor-sharp alternate history, Gerrard imagines the United States — mainly New York — shaped by a mysterious piece of technology: an odd sewing machine-like device called the Epiphany Machine that tattoos a short, pithy truth on a person’s arm.”

Featured in Washington Post’s 5 Best Fantasy Books of 2017.

$15